All tagged Equipment Selection

Keep it Clean! – Evolution of the Clean Principle

The Clean Principle began life as the “Clean Line Principle.” This principle advises that any webbing or rope loop on a throwbag is a potential snag hazard. These loops can become snagged in trees or on rocks, creating a serious and possibly fatal entrapment hazard. Rescue instructors often point out that “rope and moving water are a bad mixture.”

The Gear Shed - Creek Boats

In this article we take on the issue of creek boats and share with you some thoughts about some of the options on the market. Specifically we will be comparing the Hyside Mini-Max, a Sotar Daniel Jenkins Custom Boat, and an ARK Inflatables 10' Raft.

The Gear Shed - Wet Gear

Selecting the correct gear for the correct paddling conditions is essential to staying warm and happy in the shoulder seasons. Take time to look over your current equipment and figure out where you are in terms of your gear and consider replacing your suit so you can enjoy some happier and toastier days on the water.

The Gear Shed - Throw Bags

Rafting Magazine's Gear Shed Series takes a look inside the gear and breaks down the equipment commonly used by rafters in the field. Our expedition team discusses and analyzes some of the theories of the equipment we have all come to trust on the river. In this episode we take a look at the throwbag and what you should consider before you head out on the water with one.

Rubber vs. Plastic Boats

Rafts come in all shapes sizes colors and textures; however the composition of their materials is a hotly debated topic in the river community. There are two basic compositions for whitewater rafts rubber or plastic.

A Boater's Guide to Carabiners

Carabiners are such an ubiquitous and important fundamental of rafting life, unfortunately in the boating world we spend far too little time discussing their use and implementation. Many boaters climb as well and it is important to note that although rope work, anchors, fundamentals of force, and implementation of equipment has many parallels; applying every principal of climbing to boating paints an inaccurate picture of what the focus is on the water.